Wes Anderson-Inspired Reads

Now I know it’s odd to say, but the first half of the year I class as my ‘Wes Anderson time’. It sounds odd but from January until around the end of May is a time when the weather in England is unpredictable (when isn’t it) I like to dive into new but familiar territory. Having usually just listened to the same Christmas tunes year in, year out, when January rolls around I like to revisit and become reacquainted with familiar things like my favourite films such as The Grand Budapest Hotel whilst also delving into newer territory. This for me means sticking with the thing I love but in other formats. I did this recently with Schitt’s Creek by reading the book Best Wishes, Warmest Regards; so it felt only natural to try it with The Grand Budapest Hotel too.

Now I must admit, this is my favourite film by Wes Anderson so I do clutch onto it big time but I am really trying to verse myself in the rest of his works too and I do still have a ways to go. In the mean time though, it doesn’t hurt to take comfort in books that are a bit ‘Wes Anderson‘ too.

The Wes Anderson Collection: The Grand Budapest Hotel, Matt Zoller Seitz & Anne Washburn

I won’t go too into this book as I did only recently write a whole, rambling post about it; so instead here’s the link to that here. What I will say though, this book is beautiful. It’s a behind the scenes look at all things The Grand Budapest Hotel and goes into such depth discussing the process of making the film. I’d recommend it to anyone who loves Anderson, the film or even anyone with an interest in storytelling or movie-making.

The Society of Crossed Keys: Selections from the Writings of Stefan Zweig, Inspirations for The Grand Budapest Hotel, by Stefan Zweig, Wes Anderson & Anthea Bell

This little pink book is a compilation by Anderson showing his appreciation of Zweig’s work and showcasing his favourite pieces by him. It includes a conversation with Anderson talking about how Zweig’s work inspired him; and you can definitely read certain details in the pieces themselves which really spoke or inspired certain elements. It includes Zweig’s last work ‘The World of Yesterday’ which is nostalgic in its details of a bygone Europe. All of the pieces in this collection are deeply philosophical and thought-provoking in there musings. I wouldn’t say it’s a light read but if you have the time and the patience, I think it’s worth a read.

The Grand Budapest Hotel (Screenplay), Wes Anderson

This is what it says on the tin – screenplay of the film. One of my favourite things about The Grand Budapest Hotel is the writing. I think I’ve said it before but the writing has such a musicality to it that I absolutely love so this is such a great read for me. While the plot is inspired by the workings of Stefan Zweig and the film displays a bygone era of sophistication through its visuals, the writing and characters are still so wonderfully portrayed through simply reading the screenplay. It helps that the film is sectioned into parts like ‘Part 1: M. Gustave‘, like it was purposely made to be read. While I do love this book, I do wonder if someone could enjoy it without never watching the film.

Accidentally Wes Anderson, Wally Koval

This book was actually a birthday gift that I welcomed with open-arms, and squealing slightly. It’s beyond beautiful and is absolutely flawless in its curation. This book is somewhat a coffee-table book with the majority of it being full of vibrant photography. It’s a bit of a photo project with the composer Koval being sent these photos from all over the globe from individuals who also recognise and appreciate how settings so common place can be accidentally Wes Anderson. Koval then compiles written excerpts to accompany the photography which I found so fascinating. He included the history of some of the along with little, personal anecdotes which was lovely. It truly is the perfect book for escapism!

This book is very much the aesthetic of Anderson with the photography all checking those necessities for symmetrical lines, tiny but quirky places and pastel tones contrasted by bright blue skies. There’s definitely a mix of polished places and then the shabbier, more run down spots but all tie together under that umbrella of whimsical charm. Although, I will say some photos can feel a little eerie and ghost-town like with their lack of humanity in the shots.

The book is laid out by the photographed places area in the world, with each section beginning with a numbered map. Some of the places are more historical with the written sections appreciating their history while others are more dry and just outright comical in their commentary of the place. All of the places within are somewhat off the beaten track which is something I really love. While I think an Anderson fan would love this book, I think anyone with an interest in photography or architecture, or even just someone who enjoys flicking through a good book with beautiful, crisp photography shots and great colour palettes, would love this book. It’s a welcomed and well-loved addition to my home library.

What is something you like to revisit in new ways? Let me know.

Cheerio for now!

Best Wishes, Warmest Regards

Best Wishes, Warmest Regards: The Story of Schitt’s Creek, by Daniel Levy

It was towards the end of 2020 that I watched Schitt’s Creek and got into it in a BIG way. I binged it like it was my form of oxygen and fell in love with everything about it. Fast forward to the latter half of last year, I noticed that there was a hardback, coffee-table style book being released in October and I immediately squealed with joy whilst also sending a link to my boyfriend. He took the hint and I received it for Christmas which I was so over the moon with.

This book was beautifully curated. It had everything from interviews with the cast and crew members to photography of behind the scenes and the sets, to illustrations and fan art to even letters the show has received from their loving, supportive fans. It’s honestly a must-have for any Schitts Creek fan!

You’re so cool. You just stand your solid ground, refusing to be anything but you.

Moira Rose (to Stevie Budd)

The first section of the book is comprised of a collection of pieces of writing on each character, written by the actors who play that character (so Annie Murphy writes about Alexis Rose); which I enjoyed reading so much. All of the writing in this book was amazing but reading the amount of thought that went into becoming these characters was really quite fascinating. There was also part of this section that introduced the town of Schitt’s Creek, or more so the sets, as a character too. The amount of thought that went into every single detail about the sets, even those that were seemingly small and insignificant, was just astounding to me. There were also interviews with the crew members throughout, discussing their reasoning for certain backdrops and decisions they made that turned out to be iconic for the show. For me that’s the decor of the Rosebud Motel, that blue/teal accent wall gets my diy heart aflutter.

The rest of the book was broken down into seasons, touching on certain episodes while going into more depth with others. They didn’t touch on every single episode but I’m pretty sure they got all the iconic ones and even some of the ones I found to be more underrated. These sections were comprised of breakdowns of the episodes and scenes, including original scripts, behind the scenes facts and photography. I think the interviews included were probably my favourite written parts of the book. Reading the dynamic between certain actors, or the actors and crew members, really made me realise why Schitt’s Creek turned out in the amazing way that it has. They just got everything SO right.

Out of the episode breakdowns, I’d say I enjoyed the one with Patrick coming out to his parents the most. It was lovely to read about the process of creating that episode, and reading how delicate and thoughtful they wanted to be while approaching it. Other’s I enjoyed were The Hike and reading about the origins of those four gold rings, and then also the creation of ‘Building the Show Within a Show‘ (Cabaret). I also loved reading the behind the scenes details about ‘the’ dress and the chaos surrounding that, as well as how they created the iconic Papal-inspired look.

I can’t forget also that all the above mentioned was littered with illustrations and fan art on all facets of Schitt’s Creek. I don’t want to spoil it all but I can’t help but list some below:

  • The book titles of Schitt’s Creek, and who they’re read by throughout; think Stevie sitting at her desk (really nice little Easter eggs I try to catch now when I rewatch).
  • Moriacabulary: all those great little words she comes out with, like bébé, Podunk, pettifogging, and jabberwocky (which happens to be my favourite poem so I really love that they used this word).
  • A breakdown of the Jazzagals performances.
  • The complete collection of Moira’s wigs – in beautiful watercolour illustrations.
  • The world according to David Rose – what is correct and incorrect.
  • The complete looks of Moira Rose – we’re talking every single look. That’s a lot of black and white!
  • A world map of ‘The Adventures of Alexis Rose’, with numbered locations and her one-liner references to them (just as hilarious in writing as on the screen).
  • David Roses complete collection of knits… amazing how they all fit in that custom built wooden trunk that Mutt built him.

I’m sure there’s so much more I missed but this book was just well and truly gorgeous to me. I absolutely loved it and cannot recommend it enough to fellow Schitt’s Creek fans (also if they wanna be friends with me and have long-winded discussions about it, hit me up!).

Also, if you are a fan and you haven’t noticed (highly unlikely) there’s a documentary-styled show on Netflix under the same title as this book, Best Wishes, Warmest Regards, which also goes through the making of the show but in quite an intimate, moving way. I could’ve cried at multiple times throughout it so I’d recommend that also.

Let me know what you thought of this book, and the documentary too.

Cheerio for now!

I Am Her Tribe, Danielle Doby

What started as an instagram and hashtag movement, connecting like-minded folk of all walks of life through the storytelling and empowering words of Danielle Doby comes I Am Her Tribe. A collection of poetry drawing on this movement and growing into a safe place to, as Doby puts it on one of her first pages, ‘come as you are. your breath can rest here’.

Doby has created a book of simple moments portrayed with simple words but which has a beguiling affect on its reader. At first glance or even a skim read, these pieces don’t seem to hold much substance but when you take the time to sit with them and truly allow yourself to be taken by each piece, and the language it uses, you allow yourself to be engulfed by the emotion her work can conjure and it’s an extraordinary process. There are moments that a piece requires a slow, more thoughtful read while other pieces command to be read with a sense of urgency, the weight and emotion of the words not truly sinking in until you’ve finished reading it. Doby’s pacing and choice of language is mesmerising, and truly beautiful to behold.

both soft + fierce

can coexist

and still be powerful

I Am Her Tribe, Danielle Doby p. 137

It’s unlike other poetry that I’ve read in that it feels not so much as an individuals voice but very much a collective voice of the masses. The feel of much of her work is one of empowerment and solidarity; especially that for women which feels even more poignant given the social context since the MeToo movement and more recently the case of Sarah Everard. The raw emotion and imagery she employs in her work is moving and, while it covers many themes such as self-love, healing, and personal growth, it’s very much one of inner peace. There’s such an overwhelming sense of peace when you read her works. I personally love the astrological sign ending to the book which for me ends your reading on a more personal note – a beautiful touch.

Now I don’t want to be a Debbie-Downer and end of a negative note but I have one qualm with this book which is the cover. My copy is a matte white cover with a slight embossed title repeated several times and the authors name, all in white. While aesthetically it is somewhat cute to me, it is also becoming kinda dirty and quick to mark/scuff in all manner of ways which is infuriating to me. I love to revisit my poetry collection whenever I feel drawn to delving back into the authors work and I often take whatever book I’m in the middle of wherever I go with me so this does not bode well for this cover at all and makes me a little apprehensive to reread in the future. I also wonder how inclined readers would be to read it if they picked up a copy at that bookstore to find it a little grubby before they’ve even bought it. There that’s my nit-picking over with.

Have you read Doby’s work? What did you think?

Cheerio for now!

A Family Under the Christmas Tree, Terri Reed

Now, I mentioned this book in my Christmas Films post recently. I originally saw the film, Picture a Perfect Christmas on the movie channel in 2019 and loved it. I watched it again last Christmas and recently showed my mom it too – in a bid to get her excited and convince her that we should start decorating in late October. It weren’t until a month ago that I even realised it was based off a book and immediately I had to get my hands on a copy.

This festive tale revolves around Sophie Griffith and David Murphy, along with a few others. Sophie is a photographer whose job takes her all over the globe and while waiting for her next gig to be finalised, she’s helping her injured grandma Louise over the holidays. As she arrives in Washington state to lend a helping hand she meets David Murphy, Louise’s neighbour. Other than being outrageously attractive to Sophie, David is guardian to Troy his six-year-old nephew who Louise often helps with. Throughout her stay Sophie finds herself growing closer to the Murphy men with the help of their festive activities along with the meddling matchmaking of Louise. While they’re both attracted to one another, with Sophie about to jet off with her next assignment and David running his company and caring for Troy, surely it’s a non-starter but can they manage to make it work?

I read this book within two evenings – a personal best, I might add. It is light-hearted and full of all those festive warm and fuzzies. One thing I loved about this book is that it’s told from both Sophie and Davids point of view. That was really refreshing and just gave the story a bit more to it. Reed also does a wonderful job of capturing that chemistry and electricity between two people who are attracted to one another. I thought the ending was cute but a little vague and quick for my liking.

I found the story and characters a bit surface-level. There was a lot of potential to tap into, especially with the themes of grief and trauma which could’ve been explored so much more. I think the instant attraction between the characters made the whole ‘we can’t be together’ conflict a bit weaker especially in comparison to the strength of the attraction. This is something I preferred in the film: Sophie has a boyfriend Brent which is the obvious reason why she can’t be with David, even though something is there between them.

I’m glad I read this book and would definitely recommend to anyone who wants a light-hearted, festive romance but I think I preferred the film and will probably stick to that in the future.

Have you watched the movie or read the book, or both? What did you think?

Cheerio for now!

The Starless Sea

The Starless Sea, Erin Morgenstern.

I made the decision this year to keep a notebook with the purpose of recording my thoughts and feelings about everything that I’m reading. I wanted to keep track of everything I read, good or bad: making logs as I read so as not to lose track of anything. So often I read something that hasn’t exactly blown me away but has also struck a quiet enjoyment for me. This was one of the first books that I kept track of like this.

The Starless Sea follows Zachary Rawlins, a student who finds a book in the library and becomes utterly entranced by it. It’s contents hold much to be bewildered by, one factor being that it holds a moment of Zachary’s childhood. A memory long ‘tried’ to be forgotten but always fantasised about. Zachary is pulled into a mysterious world of masquerade balls and crowded ballrooms, secret societies and shifty characters, as well as a beguiling place far below the surface of the earth where a myriad of life and fantastical places awaits him.

Occasionally Fate can pull itself together again and Time is always waiting

Morgenstern creates a world unlike any other. Her writing has a magical quality about it, mirrored by no author I have ever encountered. Her language is almost lyrical, singing to her readers imagination. You only have to read my review of her debut novel, The Night Circus to know my profound love of her work. The Starless Sea is equally captivating in its’ settings, characters and beautifully imagery however, there were some things missing for me.

This is what his mother would call a moment with meaning. A moment that changes the moments that follow

While beautiful in so many ways, this book was very much style over substance for me. I felt quite lost through different points where it I couldn’t distinguish a main objective or purpose. There were times when I felt like Morgenstern was just taking us on a tour of this amazing world rather than showing us a clear cut story in this world. I didn’t understand the importance of Zachary in this world or how he fit into this equation. I finished this book with an overall feeling of ‘eh’. I wanted so much more out of the last few sections and really needed more to understand and finish off in a great way. I was left with so many questions: Is Zachary the new keeper? Did The Starless Sea become destroyed because it’s under someone new or has it just been concealed? Or was it actually destroyed? How does Zachary and Dorian return for his mother’s party? Do they really have a life together? So many more questions that I just need answers to and really need to discuss with other readers.

Ultimately, I think that had I not already read The Night Circus then I think I would’ve abandoned this book about two-thirds into it because it just felt aimless in it’s plot. I said to my boyfriend, I felt like I needed more pages to explain the story more. I wouldn’t recommend as a first read to Morgenstern’s works. Having said this, I do just want to add that the Bioshock and gaming references in it had my heart a flutter. They made me love Morgenstern that little bit more.

Let me know what you thought if you’ve read it.

Cheerio for now!

The Dance of the Serpents

The Dance of the Serpents, Oscar de Muriel

5/5 stars!

Ah, another incredible addition to the Frey & McGray Series. The Dance of the Serpents is a delayed follow-up of the events from the second book in the series, A Fever of the Blood. If you’re new around here you can check out my reviews of the previous books here, however I will give a brief overview of how this book relates back to the second.

A Fever of the Blood deals with the Lancashire witches and ends with McGray killing two of those witches who just so happen to be Queen Victoria’s go-to-guys for contacting her late husband. The Dance of the Serpents commences with the prime minister informing the detective duo of this and the Queen’s desire to see them both dead. The calculating prime minister comes up with an ultimatum for them though. He offers them full resources and a few of his chaperoning goons to accompany them in hopes that they can find some of the scattered members of the witch coven; who could potentially fulfil the Queen’s desires in the occult. This quest is no doubt Frey & McGray’s most dangerous yet, with both various witches trying to kill them along the way as well as the Prime minister’s goons sabotaging them at every turn.

Note: spoilers from here on out, proceed with caution.

Overall this book is a wonderful addition to the series. It has everything you would want to a Frey & McGray tale; clever and tense plot twists, complex characters and an intriguing storyline to suck you in. I will say that given how it relates back to the second book, I doubt very much that it could standalone and wouldn’t recommend it to someone without them having experienced A Fever of the Blood.

The storyline was impeccable. I must admit reading Oscar de Muriel’s previous works have trained my eye to scrutinise every twist and turn of his tales, scanning for any clues as to whose responsible but this book just completely side-swipped me. It was intricate and beautifully curated – Muriel truly left nothing to chance.

How could you do this? This book is a relic! It was already ancient when Henry VIII chose his first trollop!

Frey

Frey & McGray make for a hilarious duo. Ever witty, sarcastic and just all-round perfectly contrasted to one another and yet completely in-sync at the same time. The balance between the two characters is just spot on. Every book I feel like I notice shifts in their dynamic and how they’ve become more in tune with one another. Not just them but also their households have this terrific dynamic which is just amazing to behold.

Caroline Aldglass makes a stunning return. She is a key part of the story but also a great addition to the duo. She has such knowledge and wit, challenging the detective duo whilst also assisting them and just all round kicking things up a notch by being a total badass b!tch. There were moments of tension between her and Frey, like a mild, victorian version of Rachel and Ross from the Friends. Ultimately, I loved her in this book and would love to see her become a permanent character in future books.

Other characters I really appreciated were the return of some familiar witches such as Nettle and Oakley. I found it really interesting having the followup with them and seeing how their lives turned out after the chaos at the end of A Fever of the Blood. The prime minister, Lord Salisbury and his goons were the epitome of high-up, elite tw@ts that you really want to opportunity to smack in the gob. I mean, Boss was so irritating to me. I yearned to see him get killed in the most violent of ways. The depiction of Queen Victoria was so humorous to me. Just the whole bratty vibe was spot on for me.

Overall this book was just brilliant. Almost everything was spot on for me… BUT, yes there’s a but. I have a slight issue with the ending. Usually Frey mentions the reports and papers they’ll have to file following the events, and the various inquests, etc but this had none of that. Instead the book comes to a close as Frey has retreated to his Gloucestershire estate to recover from the hectic events. McGray visits him saying he guessed Frey wouldn’t be returning, to which Frey replies no ***GASP/HORROR/SHOCK/BETRAYAL… never ending plethora of mixed emotions***. McGray, touchingly, seemed dejected and I joined him in the mutual feeling. The prospect of no more additions and therefore, no more adventures for the duo is quite a bleak one for me although I am hoping it’s Muriel’s cunning plan to make Frey return with gusto to a sarcastic McGray saying “thought we got rid of ye, dandy”. In my mind that’s how I want things to unravel but if not, I’ll be quite happy with just the promise of more to come. (…as I’m about to schedule this post, Oscar de Muriel has actually made an announcement about the next addition to the series. I won’t go into it but I’ll just leave a lil link here for you).

Now I’ve never actually published my fave of the series in order, despite having discussed it at great length with my unwilling boyfriend; but I think I want to do that here (favourite-least favourite).

  1. Loch of the Dead
  2. The Dance of the Serpents
  3. The Strings of Murder
  4. The Darker Arts
  5. A Fever of the Blood
  6. A Mask of Shadows

I, as you can probably tell, love this series of books. Let me know what you think of them, I’d love to know.

Cheerio for now!

The Mistresses of Cliveden & Other Great Historic Reads

I have always felt drawn to those strong women in history deemed scandalous but merely trailblazing the way for others to follow. I don’t know what that says about me or my upbringing but I have just always been fascinated by them. Maybe it’s the feminist within me that finds reading about these women empowering for the rest of us or maybe their stories are just interesting in of themselves. Either way, I thought I’d share with you a few thoughts on some of my recents reads about a few books and the awe-inspiring women they revolve around.

Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire by Amanda Foreman

Often dubbed the ‘it’ girl of the eighteenth century, this beautiful book revolves around Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. Born Lady Georgiana Spencer (yes, she is an ancestor of Lady Diana Spencer), she married the fifth Duke of Devonshire in 1774. Not only was she considered the queen of the fashionable elite and aristocratic society, but she constantly exuded an aura of glamour which drew the press and public to her. She was also best buds with the Prince of Wales, closely acquainted with Marie Antoinette and an important supporter of the Whig party. For all the adoration she received in her public life, it didn’t mirror that of her life behind closed doors. The book takes you through the hardship experienced in her marriage as well as her obsession with gambling leading her into an overwhelming amount of debt and disgrace. It also details her quest for love along with the difficulties and exile that came with that.

‘Mesmirising’, as Antonia Frazer describes this gorgeous book, it takes you through Georgiana’s opulent and glamorous public life as well as her private life full of suffering. It follows the Duchesses life while also touching on society at the time such as civil unrest and royalty of the time. I have the illustrated edition which is full of beautiful pictures of the people she knew and socialised with, the places she lived or visited and objects such as the remnants of her fashionable outfits, accessories, etc. Quite apart from this, the wiring itself is informative and incredibly detailed whilst remaining readable and easy to understand. All too often I pick up historical reads that lose me within the first few pages due to their confusing lingo and stern, scholarly tone. Foreman’s writing couldn’t be further than this. It is appealing with a warm tone, illustrating her intrigue and passion to display Georgiana’s life with the attention that it deserves.

What would Boudicca do?: Everyday Problems Solved by History’s Most Remarkable Women by Elizabeth Foley & Beth Coates

As the back cover states, this book ‘will make you fired-up and ready for anything’. Showcasing fifty women from all eras and areas in the world, this book shows some fiercely, trailblazing women and the incredibly inspiring things they achieved. It includes women such as Elizabeth I, Frida Kahlo, Hypatia, Ada Lovelace, Marie Stopes, Josephine Baker and Catherine the Great. Accompanied by illustrations by Bijou Karman, it provides bitesize chunks about each woman. I wouldn’t say its the read for you if you want an in-depth, detailed account of each woman, as they only give a short, stream-lined account for each woman. Having said that, it is still a great and easy read.

The Mistresses of Cliveden: Three Centuries of Scandal, Power and Intrigue , Natalie Livingstone

I have wanted to read this book for the longest time but never actually took the plunge until now. As a total bookworm, the majority of my Christmas and birthday presents are books -this being one of them. After reading Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire by Amanda Foreman and Marie Antionette: The Journey by Antonia Fraser, I have been intrigued by all the historical scandal that rooted from such ladies. The Mistresses of Cliveden was the perfect read to cater to my curiosity on the subject.

The book is sectioned into five parts -a part dedicated to each of the mistresses at the forefront of Cliveden’s history. Those women are Anna Maria Brudnell, Elizabeth Villiers, Augusta Princess of Wales, Harriet Duchess of Sutherland, and Nancy Astor. While all of the sections are fascinating, I personally found the first two women to be the most interesting, intriguing, and scandalous. I think what is most interesting is how simple gatherings and parties held at Cliveden played such a role in British politics and society at the time. Throughout it’s history, each mistress of the stately home held such an influence in her society: whether it be through her beauty and charm, personality or politics, each woman contributed to the English society in one way or another. It adds praise to the age old saying of its not what you know but who you know.

I love the fact that the narrative revolves around the women of a place. It gives the illusion that we are privy to information and events that Cliveden’s walls would have been too. The idea that those walls have stood the test of time and witnessed all these events and people in English history.

While it is a chunky book, I think the structure of it being sectioned into five parts (which also have their own smaller chapters within) make it easier to digest. I would definitely recommend to anyone with an interest in history. It is also one hell of a read if you’re a feminist -these women really paved a way for us. Even if you’re not into history, I’d say it’s an easy entry into the more heavier historical non-fiction.

If you love historic reads or even want to try something new then I’d definitely recommend all three of these reads. I have so many more I want to recommend too but I think I’ll hold off and keep this post at those three for now.

Stay safe – Cheerio for now!

Book Review: Rapture (Bioshock)

Rapture (Bioshock), John Shirley

Where to begin.

So, this book is a prequel to the first two Bioshock games. It gives you a wealth of knowledge about the characters and what led them to Rapture which, once you have read these things, gives you a whole new depth of backstory and layer to enrich the games.

I’d highly recommend this book to anyone who has played the games however, I think even people who haven’t or have no knowledge of the games plot would also really enjoy this book.

Would you kindly?

In a post-war world, everyone seeks to rebuild a life they once had – one man has a vision, Andrew Ryan. He manifests an underwater utopian society free from government, censorship and moral restrictions on science; for both men and women to build a better life away from the corruption above the surface. Using his wealth, he creates this shinning city beneath the sea; a world of autonomy and liberty . But of course, as all worlds and civilisations have, there are rules and a manner of conduct that Andrew expects to be followed – what could go wrong?

The plot slowly turns sour with an idyllic world slowly transforming into a living nightmare. With autonomy and liberty, as well as the lack of government and restrictions on science, people begin to do as they like. Hidden dreams and fantasies start to take shape and with the natural greed of mankind, everyone wants it for themselves.

The structure of flits from dates and places, following numerous characters and showing their opinions of, and paths to, Rapture. The story ends just as the Bioshock game begins, making sure not to overlap and become boring or repetitive.

I found that the text posed a lot more philosophical questions for me than the game, specifically the idea of ‘one bad apple’ and the corruption of mankind being inevitable wherever peace tries to prevail.

Although I say that anyone would enjoy this book, even those who haven’t played the games, I will say that while it is true to the games, I do also think it flushes out a lot of the world and story that isn’t explored in the games. I also wonder how I would have felt reading it without knowledge, or experience, of the games. Would I be able to picture the splicers? Would I be able to keep up with the multiple characters or envisage Rapture in all its’ glory? I’m not so sure.

All in all, I enjoyed this book and I’d recommend it.

Cheerio for now.